IIS 8.5 Dynamic Compression Issue 1

Windows Server 2012 R2 comes with IIS 8.5, and in this release an issue has been found in relation to the Dynamic Compression module.  The module sets the “Vary” header which is used to specify caching properties that the browser uses to determine whether the response should be cached or not. 

In IIS 8.0 and earlier, the Dynamic Compression module was overwriting the Vary header with the value “Accept-Encoding”, and as it happens this is the correct value to ensure that dynamic content is correctly cached – but – according to IIS it should be appending this value to the existing value and not overwriting it.

As it happens, this was supposed to be fixed in IIS 8.5 but the fix appears to be broken.   In IIS 8.5 (which ships with Windows Server 2012 R2) the Vary header is being set to “*” and the “Accept-Encoding” from the Dynamic Compression module is not appended.  The result of this is that no dynamic content is being cached by the browser.

Workaround

Thankfully there is an easy workaround in IIS 8.5 for this:

1. Select an IIS site, and go to Configuration Editor.

image

2. Select system.web/caching/outputCache section, then set the omitVaryStar property to true

image

image

Setting this value results in the Vary header being returned with a value of “Accept-Encoding” and the browser then caches the dynamic content.


Internet Society urges public comment on draft Online Copyright Infringement Code

image001

NEWS RELEASE                               

The Internet Society of Australia has urged its members and all interested parties to take advantage of the opportunity to comment on the draft Online Copyright Infringement Code released today.

Following a period for public comment a finalised Code will be submitted in April for registration by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

The Internet Society is a member of the stakeholder advisory group that had input into the draft Code. However, CEO Laurie Patton has indicated that the Society is keen for its members to provide their views on the draft during the public comment period.

“It’s not often that the public is given the ability to make its voice heard on important initiatives such as this. There are many aspects of the draft Code that will impact on Internet users and it is important that every angle is presented and considered before ACMA accepts the Code for registration”, Mr Patton commented.

About the Internet Society

The Internet Society of Australia (also known as ISOC-AU) is the Australian chapter of the worldwide Internet Society and is a not-for-profit organisation founded in 1996. Its mission is to promote Internet developments for the benefit of the whole community, including business, educational, professional and private Internet users.

Its directors and members hold significant roles in Internet-related organisations and enable the Society to provide high level policy and technical information to Internet user groups, governments and regulatory authorities.
Globally, the Internet Society coordinates Internet policy development and technical standards.

This includes advising the United Nations and international Internet management organisations such as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and the five Regional Registries. The Internet Society is responsible for the Internet Engineering Task Force. See: www.internet.org.au